Unsafe And Safe Flowers For Dogs

Do you have a garden that you love to keep pretty and proper but you also have a dog and want to make sure that they’re as safe as they can be when they’re outside enjoying the sun?

Take a look at the helpful list of what safe flowers you can have in your garden and what unsafe flowers you need to look out for and maybe only put in hanging baskets or out of your dogs reach. Of course, if you have a dog that doesn’t eat all the flowers in the garden then you’ll be fine, unlike Toby!

Dog Safe Flowers

Dogs are family and for a lot of people they’re pretty much their children and that’s why we want to keep them safe at all times and that includes everywhere they go, even in the garden. Having a garden with dog-safe flowers is important for several reasons:

  1. Protecting your pet’s health: Dogs are curious animals and may be inclined to explore and even nibble on plants in the garden. By choosing dog-safe flowers, you reduce the risk of your pet ingesting toxic plants, which can lead to poisoning and serious health complications.
  2. Preventing accidents: Ingesting toxic plants can result in various symptoms ranging from gastrointestinal upset to organ damage or failure, and in severe cases, it can be fatal. Avoiding toxic flowers helps prevent accidents and potential emergencies involving your pet.
  3. Peace of mind: Knowing that your garden contains only safe plants for your dog can give you peace of mind. You can relax and enjoy spending time outdoors with your pet without worrying about potential dangers lurking in the garden.
  4. Promoting a pet-friendly environment: Creating a garden with dog-safe flowers promotes a pet-friendly environment where your furry companion can roam freely without restrictions. It allows both you and your pet to enjoy the beauty of the garden together.
  5. Enhancing the bond with your pet: Spending time outdoors in a safe and inviting garden strengthens the bond between you and your dog. You can engage in activities such as playing fetch, going for walks, or simply lounging in the garden, fostering a deeper connection with your pet.

Overall, having a garden with dog-safe flowers not only benefits your pet’s health and well-being but also enhances your outdoor living experience and strengthens the bond between you and your furry friend.

Pet Safe Flowers For Garden

Take a look at the list of dog safe flowers for the garden below and make sure you have some amazing flowers making your garden look excellent while keeping your dog safe at the same time!

  1. Roses (Rosa spp.): Roses are generally non-toxic to dogs, but it’s essential to watch out for thorns, which can cause injury if your dog accidentally steps on or chews them.
  2. Marigolds (Tagetes spp.): Marigolds are safe for dogs and are known for their bright, cheerful blooms. They contain compounds that repel insects, which can be helpful in keeping pests away from your garden.
  3. Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus): Sunflowers are safe for dogs and can add a beautiful, vibrant touch to your garden. They also produce edible seeds that you and your dog can enjoy together.
  4. Petunias (Petunia spp.): Petunias are safe for dogs and come in a wide range of colors, making them a versatile choice for garden beds, borders, or hanging baskets.
  5. Snapdragons (Antirrhinum spp.): Snapdragons are safe for dogs and have distinctive, snap-like flowers that can provide visual interest in your garden. They are also relatively easy to grow and maintain.
  6. Zinnias (Zinnia spp.): Zinnias are safe for dogs and come in various shapes, sizes, and colors, making them a popular choice for adding color to gardens and attracting pollinators like butterflies.
  7. Aster (Aster spp.): Asters are safe for dogs and bloom in late summer and fall, providing a burst of color when many other flowers are fading. They are also attractive to bees and butterflies.
  8. Impatiens (Impatiens spp.): Impatiens are safe for dogs and thrive in shady areas, making them an excellent choice for gardens with limited sunlight. They produce colorful flowers that can brighten up any space.
  9. Calendula (Calendula officinalis): Calendula, also known as pot marigold, is safe for dogs and has medicinal properties. It’s often used in herbal remedies for its anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties.
  10. Nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus): Nasturtiums are safe for dogs and have edible flowers and leaves. They also act as a natural deterrent for pests like aphids and whiteflies.

There’s no reason why you can’t have an amazing looking garden and keep your dog safe at the same time. If you’re looking for more information on what plants are safe and unsafe for dogs, take a look at our safe and unsafe plats for dogs article and make sure you’re taking care of your dog the best you can.

Pet Safe Flowers List

Here’s a list of flowers that are generally considered safe for pets:

  1. African Violet (Saintpaulia spp.): These indoor plants produce colorful, low-growing flowers and are safe for both cats and dogs.
  2. Alyssum (Lobularia maritima): Alyssum produces clusters of small, fragrant flowers and is safe for cats and dogs.
  3. Begonia (Begonia spp.): Begonias come in various colors and sizes and are safe for cats and dogs.
  4. Calendula (Calendula officinalis): Also known as pot marigold, calendula produces bright, cheerful flowers and is safe for cats and dogs.
  5. Camellia (Camellia spp.): Camellias produce beautiful, waxy flowers and are safe for cats and dogs.
  6. Fuchsia (Fuchsia spp.): Fuchsias produce vibrant, pendulous flowers and are safe for cats and dogs.
  7. Hibiscus (Hibiscus spp.): Hibiscus produces large, showy flowers and is safe for cats and dogs.
  8. Impatiens (Impatiens spp.): Impatiens come in various colors and are safe for cats and dogs.
  9. Marigold (Tagetes spp.): Marigolds produce bright, cheerful flowers and are safe for cats and dogs.
  10. Snapdragon (Antirrhinum spp.): Snapdragons produce unique, snap-like flowers and are safe for cats and dogs.
  11. Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum): Spider plants produce long, arching leaves and are safe for cats and dogs.
  12. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus): Sunflowers produce large, sunny blooms and are safe for cats and dogs.
  13. Thistle (Cirsium spp. and Carduus spp.): Thistles produce spiky, globe-shaped flowers and are safe for cats and dogs.
  14. Zinnia (Zinnia spp.): Zinnias come in various colors and sizes and are safe for cats and dogs.

Remember, while these flowers are generally considered safe for pets, it’s essential to monitor your pets in the garden and discourage them from nibbling on plants. Additionally, individual sensitivities can vary, so if you have any concerns or if your pet exhibits unusual symptoms after interacting with a plant, consult your veterinarian for guidance.

Unsafe Flowers For Dogs

It’s important to make sure you don’t have a garden full of unsafe flowers for dogs. If you’re a gardener you might already be aware that some flowers can have a very negative impact on dogs, just like the positivie impact that catnip has on cats.

Take a look at the list of unsafe flowers for dogs below and make sure there’s nothing in your garden that can make your furchild unwell, because we all know vet bills can be very expensive!

  1. Lilies (Lilium spp. and Hemerocallis spp.): Many species of lilies, including Easter lilies, tiger lilies, and Asiatic lilies, are highly toxic to dogs, especially cats. Ingesting any part of the plant, including the flowers, leaves, stems, and pollen, can cause severe kidney damage and even be fatal if not treated promptly.
  2. Tulips (Tulipa spp.): Tulips contain toxic compounds called tulipalin A and B, which are found in all parts of the plant but are most concentrated in the bulbs. Ingesting tulip bulbs or other parts of the plant can cause gastrointestinal upset, drooling, nausea, vomiting, and, in severe cases, difficulty breathing and organ damage.
  3. Hyacinths (Hyacinthus spp.): Hyacinths contain similar toxic compounds to tulips and can cause similar symptoms if ingested by dogs. The bulbs are the most toxic part of the plant, but all parts, including the flowers and leaves, can cause gastrointestinal upset and other symptoms.
  4. Azaleas (Rhododendron spp.): Azaleas contain grayanotoxins, which can cause vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, weakness, and even cardiovascular collapse if ingested by dogs. All parts of the plant, including the flowers, leaves, stems, and nectar, are toxic.
  5. Daffodils (Narcissus spp.): Daffodils contain toxic compounds called alkaloids, which can cause gastrointestinal upset, drooling, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and, in severe cases, convulsions and tremors if ingested by dogs. The bulbs are the most toxic part of the plant, but all parts, including the flowers and leaves, can cause symptoms.
  6. Oleander (Nerium oleander): Oleander is a highly toxic plant that contains cardiac glycosides, which can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias, gastrointestinal upset, drooling, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, tremors, seizures, and even death if ingested by dogs. All parts of the plant, including the flowers, leaves, stems, and sap, are toxic.
  7. Foxglove (Digitalis spp.): Foxglove contains cardiac glycosides, similar to oleander, which can cause severe cardiac arrhythmias, gastrointestinal upset, drooling, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, tremors, seizures, and even death if ingested by dogs. All parts of the plant, including the flowers, leaves, stems, and seeds, are toxic.
  8. Rhododendrons (Rhododendron spp.): Rhododendrons contain grayanotoxins, similar to azaleas, which can cause vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, weakness, and even cardiovascular collapse if ingested by dogs. All parts of the plant, including the flowers, leaves, stems, and nectar, are toxic.

These are just a few examples of flowers that are toxic to dogs. It’s essential to research any plants before introducing them to your garden to ensure they are safe for your pets. If you suspect your dog has ingested a toxic plant, contact your veterinarian immediately for guidance and treatment.

Unsafe Flowers For Pets List

Here’s a basic list of flowers that are generally considered unsafe for pets:

  1. Lilies (Lilium spp. and Hemerocallis spp.): Highly toxic to cats, especially, and can also be harmful to dogs.
  2. Tulips (Tulipa spp.): All parts, particularly the bulbs, contain toxic compounds.
  3. Hyacinths (Hyacinthus spp.): Bulbs are especially toxic to pets.
  4. Azaleas (Rhododendron spp.): Contains grayanotoxins that can cause severe symptoms.
  5. Daffodils (Narcissus spp.): All parts contain toxic compounds, especially the bulbs.
  6. Oleander (Nerium oleander): Highly toxic to pets, causing severe symptoms if ingested.
  7. Foxglove (Digitalis spp.): Contains cardiac glycosides, which are toxic to pets.
  8. Rhododendrons (Rhododendron spp.): Similar to azaleas, containing toxic grayanotoxins.
  9. Morning Glory (Ipomoea spp.): Seeds can be toxic if ingested.
  10. Castor Bean (Ricinus communis): Contains ricin, highly toxic to pets.

This list provides a starting point, but it’s essential to research any plant thoroughly before introducing it into your home or garden, especially if you have pets. If you suspect your pet has ingested a toxic plant, seek veterinary care immediately.